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3 Ways the Pandemic Has Changed the Way You Renovate


If you're like me, you've spent the last year and a half at home, thinking about your home. My husband's work shifted so that he's only in the office a few days a week, our entertaining has shifted to outdoors, and we have all logged more hours on our family sectional than we'd like to admit!


Because of the pandemic, you have spent more time at home with your family, working, cooking, and living. As a result, you may have realized your home needs better flow, more space, or you want to use old spaces for a new purpose.


I want you to have a successful renovation, so today I’m letting you in on the 3 ways the pandemic has changed renovations so you can have the space of your dreams. Let’s go!

1. Increase in Demand


You may have been able to live comfortably in your home when you were only there a few hours a day. But now you are experiencing problem areas, and they feel magnified. You want to get them resolved because you are spending significantly more time at home.

The pandemic changed the way you want to feel in your home. You want your home to feel like a sanctuary. You value a home that is working for you with the flow and function of your family. And because you (and many others) want to create a beautiful, livable space, there has been a jump in demand for home products, interior design services, and renovations.


I suspect these trends will continue, especially for jobs in many sectors where remote work is possible.

2. Decrease in Supply


The supply chain has been wild. Because of big storms, we've lost foam production in Texas and fabric manufacturing in Miami. Appliance suites are now running 4-5 months out, plus with higher demand, even without supply chain interruptions, we just don't have enough skilled laborers to make much of what is needed.


When you hire a designer for your renovation, they help coordinate all the material and furnishing orders, which takes stress off of you because managing supplies right now is a full-time job. Designers also have resources and access to places like showrooms that may allow you to get what you want and faster.

3. Longer Wait Times & Timelines


I tell my clients to come into any project now with patience. For those doing renovations, I advise we order as much as we can upfront so that the materials lag time doesn't stop the contractor once he's on-site and ready to rock and roll. Contractors appreciate this, too, as it helps them schedule their trades.


For full-service design clients, what was once a 12-20 week project is now a 20-50 week project. The good news is that a lot of this time is passive while waiting for orders. So we don't get the instant gratification we used to, but now we get to really appreciate the end result when my installers deliver it.


How Can I Help?


As a professional, this has been a lot to navigate. But I know who has supply, where to find items in stock, and have relationships with trade sources who can often squeeze my clients in as a favor to me. My full-service clients get regular updates on where things are and even just reassurance during the quiet times that things are moving along, slowly but surely.

If you're looking for a partner who will have your back every step of the way, reach out to us. We'd love to help!

Cheers,

Carol



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